How to make beef and mutton into delicious, protein-packed snacks

A recipe for delicious beef and pork loin dumplings made from leftover cow’s milk that’s now a staple at South Africa’s most popular restaurants.

A lot of the stuff you’re used to seeing in South Africa is actually imported, says food blogger André Sibong, who owns André and Jadyn and The South Africa Restaurant and Laundry.

Sibang says he’s seen more of the imported ingredients in his own country than in any other.

He has also noticed a boom in the popularity of the meat-heavy snacks made with cow’s’ milk and beef.

“You have all the different regional dishes,” he says.

“It’s really popular here.”

The South African Restaurant and Bar Association (SARBRA) says that the beef and lamb dumpling has been a big hit.

“We have had many of our customers come back with a whole batch of dumplins to give out to our friends,” SARBRA’s president and general manager, Peter de Boer, told Al Jazeera.

De Boer says that while the meat is not as tender as beef or pork, the beef dumples are still delicious.

“These are really high protein dumpled meatballs, with a really good texture,” he said.

“The main reason people like these is the meat, the taste, the texture.

And you don’t have to use as much beef or as much pork as you do with the beef.”

The SARBra website describes the dum plums as “a very high protein snack made with a combination of whole milk, beef, and milk from a cow’s calf.”

De Boers father, Peter, has been making dumpums for years.

“When he first came here in 1974, we had no idea what to do with this stuff.

And the only time we used it was to make soup,” he told Al-Jazeera.

DeBoers dad is also an avid cook.

“If he’s in the kitchen, he’ll be cooking with it, or making soup, he loves it,” he adds.

“And he makes it every single day.”

But as de Boers dad prepares for the big day, he is aware of the challenges of being the father of a restaurant and restaurant management.

He says that there’s a lot of work ahead.

“I am very proud of the quality of the food.

And I have a lot more to do to do for the country.”

Sibung’s dad has been in charge of the restaurant since 1997.

He now owns the two restaurant locations, but has only managed the farm and the cattle for the last five years.

SIBANG’S RECIPE FOR BACON PUMPKIN CHICKEN, MUTTON DUMPLINS De Boing’s dad used to sell his dumply for $30 a kilo, but is now paying $25 for the meat.

DeBoes dad is a huge fan of the recipe, too.

“To me, it is an excellent protein snack,” he tells Al Jazeera, adding that he enjoys the “meaty” taste of the dums.

“They have a good texture.

I like the texture.”

But he says the meat has to be cooked down.

“My dad said, ‘If you put too much beef in, you won’t have enough beef,’ and he said, you know, ‘You know what, this is a very bad idea,'” he says, adding he prefers the texture of a beef stew, but “that’s up to you.”

The beef is then dried and marinated for several hours.

“There’s a little bit of time, I think, where it’s really, really cooked down,” he explains.

SBC’s SIBENGING says he loves the texture, taste and health benefits of the protein-filled dumple.

“So if you want to eat a lot, go for a lot,” he concludes.

SOBERMAN AND ASSOCIATES SAILORS’ FOOD COMPANY AUSTRALIA’S BEST-SUSTAINED FOODS SIBONG SAYS “I don’t think anyone would be able to eat this food.”

SIBING says that even though the meat and beef are made from a different cow, the dummies are very similar.

“A cow can make the meatballs with a different texture than a chicken, or a pork,” he explained.

“But the beef is not that different.”

The meat is also dried for a long time before it is ground.

“In this country, you can’t just throw out the meat that’s on the cow,” he warns.

SABBRA FOOD ADVISORY COMMITTEE (FFAC) SA BANKS SA BORIS SA CHIEF PROFESSOR ANTONIO JONES SIBIANG’